invasive

A new species of frog from the Caribbean island of Montserrat (Eleutherodactylidae, Eleutherodactylus)

Abstract

I describe a new species of frog, Eleutherodactylus montserratae sp. nov., from Montserrat, previously confused with E. johnstonei Barbour. It is native to that island and has been introduced, and established, on other Lesser Antillean islands west of 62 degrees west longitude including Anguilla, St. Martin/St. Maarten, St. Barthélemy, Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Christopher, and Nevis, as well as Bermuda. Previous chromosome and molecular studies have shown that populations from these islands are distinct from E. johnstonei, a species occurring east of 62 degrees west longitude in the Lesser Antilles, and elsewhere, but could not identify diagnostic morphological differences. Here, I show that the new species differs morphologically in being smaller (males and females) and having a proportionately larger tympanum, a wider head, and greater separation between the nostrils. Both species have been introduced within and outside of the Caribbean region and will likely expand their ranges in the future.

 

https://www.mapress.com/zt/article/view/zootaxa.5219.4.5

 

Date
2022
Data type
Scientific article
Theme
Research and monitoring
Journal
Geographic location
Saba
St. Eustatius
St. Maarten

Seagrass and Seagrass Beds

Seagrasses are found in shallow salty and brackish waters in many parts of the world, from the tropics to the Arctic Circle. Seagrasses are so-named because most species have long green, grass-like leaves.They are often confused with seaweeds, but are actually more closely related to the flowering plants that you see on land. Seagrasses have roots, stems and leaves, and produce flowers and seeds. They evolved around 100 million years ago, and today there are approximately 72 different seagrass species that belong to four major groups. Seagrasses can form dense underwater meadows, some of which are large enough to be seen from space. Although they often receive little attention, they are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world. Seagrasses provide shelter and food to an incredibly diverse community of animals, from tiny invertebrates to large fish, crabs, turtles, marine mammals and birds. Seagrasses provide many important services to people as well, but many seagrasses meadows have been lost because of human activities. Work is ongoing around the world to restore these important ecosystems.

Contents of document:

  • Introduction
  • What are seagrasses
  • Growth and reproduction
  • Biodiversity
  • Ecosytem benefits
  • Threats and conservation
  • Seagrass at the Smithsonian
  • Additional resources
  • More like this

Document retrieved from Smithsonian Ocean portal at 22 March 2018

Date
2018
Data type
Other resources
Theme
Education and outreach
Geographic location
Aruba
Bonaire
Curacao
Saba
Saba bank
St. Eustatius
St. Maarten

First record of a Caribbean green turtle (Chelonia mydas) grazing on invasive seagrass (Halophila stipulacea)

From Bonaire, we here provide the first documented case of the green turtle feeding on the invasive seagrass, Halophila stipulacea, in the Caribbean. The seagrass is rapidly invading existing seagrass meadows and altering key foraging habitat of this endangered marine reptile throughout the eastern Caribbean. We expect that more records of green turtles feeding on this invasive species will gradually follow from throughout the region and that the green turtle might alter its foraging behavior in response to the changing species composition of its foraging habitat. 

Date
2014
Data type
Scientific article
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Bonaire