Fish

Geographic variation in Poecilia Bloch and Schneider, 1801 (Teleostei: Poeciliidae), with descriptions of three new species and lectotypes for P. dovii Günther, 1866 and for P. vandepolli van Lidth de Jeude, 1887

Abstract:

The South American species with the vernacular name "mollies" are analyzed and three new species of the genus Poecilia are described and figured, viz., P. boesemani n. sp. from Trinidad, P. koperi n. sp. from Venezuela and Colombia, and P. wandae n. sp. from Lake Maracaibo. Thirteen species of Poecilia are presently recognized from the northeastern part of South America and adjacent islands, viz., six mollies (including P. vivipara and P. caucana), five micropoeciliids, P. heterandria and the guppy (P. reticulata). Two different populations in both P. koperi and P. wandae are recognized, based on variation in pigmentation. From the type series of P. dovii Günther, 1866 and P. vandepolli Van Lidth de Jeude, 1887 lectotypes are selected. Four subspecies of P. gillii are defined as morphologically distinct and geographically correlated populations.

Poecilia reticulata, P. heterandria, and the micropoeciliids P. bifurca, P. parae, P. picta, P. branneri and P. minima are not considered, whereas P. laurae remains a species inquirendae. A geocline in characters of the species of Poecilia is recorded and a possible evolution is discussed. 

Date
2003
Data type
Scientific article
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Aruba
Bonaire
Curacao
Author

A Review of the Freshwater Fishes of Curaçao, with Comments on those of Aruba and Bonaire

Abstract:

Based on a field survey and review of published records, I report the occurrence of 13 species of fishes in fresh waters of Curaçao. Seven species are new or previously unpublished freshwater records for the island. New records are also provided for the adjacent islands of Aruba and Bonaire. Although the native freshwater fish fauna is dominated by predatory gobiid and eleotrid fishes, the most frequently encountered species was the endemic molly, Poecilia vandepolli. The next most frequent species was the native mountain mullet (Agonostomus monticola), followed by the exotic Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and the native emerald sleeper (Erotelis smaragdus). High dams block surface water flows in Curaçao and prevent migration of native amphidromous fish. The introduced tilapia has apparently reduced the abundance of native species. 

Date
2003
Data type
Scientific article
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Aruba
Bonaire
Curacao
Author

Geographic coupling of juvenile and adult habitat shapes spatial population dynamics of a coral reef fish

Abstract:

Marine spatial population dynamics are often addressed with a focus on larval dispersal, without taking into account movement behavior of individuals in later life stages. Processes occurring during demersal life stages may also drive spatial population dynamics if habitat quality is perceived differently by animals belonging to different life stages. In this study, we used a dual approach to understand how stage-structured habitat use and dispersal ability of adults shape the population of a marine fish species. Our study area and focal species provided us with the unique opportunity to study a closed island population. A spatial simulation model was used to estimate dispersal distances along a coral reef that surrounds the island, while contributions of different nursery bays were determined based on otolith stable isotope signatures of adult reef fish. The model showed that adult dispersal away from reef areas near nursery bays is limited. The results further show that different bays contributed unequally to the adult population on the coral reef, with productivity of juveniles in bay nursery habitat determining the degree of mixing among local populations on the reef and with one highly productive area contributing most to the island’s reef fish population. The contribution of the coral reef as a nursery habitat was minimal, even though it had a much larger surface area. These findings indicate that the geographic distribution of nursery areas and their productivity are important drivers for the spatial distribution patterns of adults on coral reefs. We suggest that limited dispersal of adults on reefs can lead to a source–sink structure in the adult stage, where reefs close to nurseries replenish more isolated reef areas. Understanding these spatial population dynamics of the demersal phase of marine animals is of major importance for the design and placement of marine reserves, as nursery areas contribute differently to maintain adult populations.

Date
2013
Data type
Scientific article
Theme
Research and monitoring
Journal
Geographic location
Curacao

Saba Bank research expedition 2011 – Progress Report

Abstract:

The Saba Bank is a large submerged carbonate platform of approximately 2,200 km2 in the Caribbean Sea which lies partially within the Exclusive Economic Zone of the Netherlands and partially within the territorial waters of Saba and St. Eustatius. It was declared a protected area by the Dutch Government on 15 December 2010 and has been registered as such in the Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife (SPAW) protocol of the Cartagena Convention for the Protection and Development of the Marine Environment of the Wider Caribbean. Applications for a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) at IMO and Ecological or Biological Significant Area (EBSA) at CBD are pending.

As part of the Saba Bank research program 2011-2016, commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs (EZ), an expedition to the Saba Bank was conducted from 22 to 29 October 2011. The Saba Bank research program aims to obtain information on the biodiversity, key ecological processes and carrying capacity for commercial fisheries to facilitate sustainable management of the area. The primary objectives of the 2011 research expedition were to collect data on benthic and reef fish communities; sponges and nutritional sources of the sponge community; seabirds and marine mammals; water quality, water velocity and other physical parameters. A multidisciplinary team conducted video and visual surveys on benthos, fish and sponges during 10 SCUBA dives at 20-30m depth, while sea birds and marine mammals were surveyed by means of on-board visual surveys and acoustic data loggers. Water velocity and water quality were also measured on-board using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) device.

During the expedition 8 sponge species were collected and 37 scleractinian coral species and 85 fish species were identified.Fish biomass varied per site between 1.3 kg to 4.4 kg.
Part of the measurements on water velocity, water quality and benthic cover are still in the process of being analysed. Data collected will also be used as baseline for future monitoring and analyses of biodiversity and key ecological processes within the framework of the 2011-2016 research program. 

Date
2013
Data type
Research report
Theme
Research and monitoring
Report number
C018/13
Geographic location
Saba bank

Update on geographic spread of invasive lionfishes (Pterois volitans and P. miles) in the Western North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico

The Indo-Pacific lionfishes (Pterois volitans [Linnaeus, 1758] and P. miles [Bennett, 1828]: Family Scorpaenidae) are the first nonnative marine fishes to establish in the Western North Atlantic/Caribbean region. The chronology of the invasion was reported last year (Schofield 2009) using records from the US Geological Survey’s Nonindigenous Aquatic Species database. This article provides an update of lionfish geographic spread (as of October 2010) and predictions of future range

Date
2010
Data type
Scientific article
Theme
Research and monitoring

Invasive red lionfish Pterois volitans blow directed jets of water at prey fish

Field and laboratory observations of feeding by invasive Pacific red lionfish Pterois volitans were conducted during June through August of 2008, 2009 and 2010 near Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas. Observations of this invasive marine predator revealed a previously undocumented piscivorous behavior. While slowly approaching prey fish, lionfish produce jets of water directed toward their prey. These jets may confuse or distract prey, and often result in prey fish facing the attacking lionfish, increasing the probability of head-first capture and swallowing. While a variety of fishes are re - ported to create directed water jets, to our knowledge, this is the first report of a fish that does so during the capture of fish prey. This behavior may confer a high degree of predatory efficiency, and thus contribute to the dramatic success of this Pacific invader of tropical Western Atlantic and Caribbean coral reefs

Date
2012
Data type
Scientific article
Theme
Research and monitoring

Corals Chemically Cue Mutualistic Fishes to Remove Competing Seaweeds

Corals in the genus Acropora generate much of the structural complexity upon which coral reefs depend, but they are susceptible to damage from toxic seaweeds. Acropora nasuta minimizes this damage by chemically cuing symbiotic goby fishes (Gobiodon histrio or Paragobiodon echinocephalus) to remove the toxic seaweed Chlorodesmis fastigiata. Within minutes of seaweed contact, or contact from only seaweed chemical extract, the coral releases an odor that recruits gobies to trim the seaweed and dramatically reduce coral damage that would otherwise occur. In turn, chemically defended gobies become more toxic after consumption of this noxious alga. Mutualistic gobies and corals appear to represent a marine parallel to terrestrial ant-plants, in that the host provides shelter and food in return for protection from natural enemies

Date
2012
Data type
Scientific article
Theme
Research and monitoring
Journal

Lionfish Invasion off the Northern Coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, Southern Gulf of Mexico: What Do we Know?

Abstract:

In 2009, the first lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) was found in the Parque Nacional Arrecifes de Cozumel, in Quintana Roo, in the Mexican Caribbean; however, no official record was published about this finding but just anecdotic evidence. Early in 2010, we organized workshops to lobster diver-fishermen from the northern Yucatan Peninsula on lionfish biology and potential threat of invasion, and invited them to safely collect lionfish and record basic information. In late 2010, a fisherman captured the first lionfish for the Gulf of Mexico 130 km off the northern Yucatan coast, and 50 km off eastern Alacranes Reef National Park (ARNP). Fishermen showed positive responses; thus, more workshops were organized. From 2010 to 2011, about 445 lionfish (90 - 274 mm TL) were voluntarily collected by fishermen: 1) along the coast: El Cuyo (N = 53; size range 110 - 195 mm TL), Las Coloradas (n = 1; 186 mm TL), Río Lagartos (n = 81; 139 - 327 mm TL), San Felipe (n = 2; 255-274 mm TL), Dzilam de Bravo (n = 9; 97 - 140 mm TL) Telchac Puerto (n = 1; 155 mm TL), Progreso (n = 3; 132 - 153 mm TL) and Sisal (n = 1; 145 mm TL) and 2) off the coast: Bajos del Norte (n = 21; 83 - 217 mm TL), ARNP (n = 269; 90 - 260 mm TL), and Cayo Arenas (n = 4; 134 - 180 mm TL). This work showed that 1) local community participation on conservation is viable and 2) the lionfish invaded the northern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. This abundance represents a pale number of lionfish since collections were only on a voluntary basis. It is necessary finding ways of collaboration with monitoring initiatives in the Mexican Caribbean and establishing others (Campeche and Veracruz) to reach decisive actions for the lionfish invasion in Mexico. 

Date
2011
Data type
Scientific article
Theme
Research and monitoring

Rapid invasion of Indo-Pacific lionfishes (Pterios volitans and P.miles) in the Florida Keys, USA: Evidence from multiple pre- and postinvasion data sets

Over the past decade, Indo-Pacific lionfishes, Pterois volitans (Linnaeus, 1758) and Pterois miles (Bennett, 1828), venomous members of the scorpionfish family (Scorpaenidae), have invaded and spread throughout much of the tropical and subtropical northwestern Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. These species are generalist predators of fishes and invertebrates with the potential to disrupt the ecology of the invaded range. Lionfishes have been present in low numbers along the east coast of Florida since the 1980s, but were not reported in the Florida Keys until 2009. We document the appearance and rapid spread of lionfishes in the Florida Keys using multiple long-term data sets that include both pre- and post-invasion sampling. Our results are the first to quantify the invasion of lionfishes in a new area using multiple independent, ongoing monitoring data sets, two of which have explicit estimates of sampling effort. Between 2009 and 2011, lionfish frequency of occurrence, abundance, and biomass increased rapidly, increasing three- to six-fold between 2010 and 2011 alone. In addition, individuals were detected on a variety of reef and non-reef habitats throughout the Florida Keys. Because lionfish occurrence, abundance, and impacts are expected to continue to increase throughout the region, monitoring programs like those used in this study will be essential to document ecosystem changes that may result from this invasion.

Date
2012
Data type
Scientific article
Theme
Research and monitoring

Kennisvraag haaien: wat is er bekend over haaien voor de voor Nederland relevante gebieden?

Date
2012
Data type
Research report
Theme
Governance
Legislation
Geographic location
Aruba
Bonaire
Curacao
Saba
St. Eustatius
St. Maarten