cyanobacteria

Coral inventory Bonaire, 2014 and 2017

 

  • zone    DO = DROP-OFF at ~10m depth, LT= Lower Terrace at ~5m depth
  • length transect in cm
  • rugosity    measure for 3-dimensional complexity reef:  length transect following substrate (cm) / plain length transect (cm)
  • Average heigh in cm of coral colonies along transect
  • date
  • Depth in meters
  • start.time   
  • end.time  
  • latitude
  • longitude
  • Crustose coralline algal cover (proportion)
  • Coral cover (proportion)
  • cayno bacterial cover (proportion)
  • macroalgal cover (proportion)
  • other cover (proportion)
  • rubble cover (proportion)
  • sand cover (proportion)
  • soft coral cover (proportion)
  • sponge cover (proportion)
  • bare substrate cover (proportion)
  • turf cover (proportion)
  • Transect to left (L) from starting point and to right (R) from starting point
  • MPA=Marine Protected Area, ND=No Diving, NF=No Fishing
  • Entry into water, either from boat or from shore

     
Date
2017
Data type
Raw data
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Bonaire
Image

Large scale, medium scale, and small scale patterns of benthic cyanobacteria & the possibility of groundwater association on a coral reef

Cyanobacteria presence in the marine ecosystem is biologically significant due to its versatile nature. This phylum is responsible for destructive red tides and black band disease as well as building up the limestone in reefs. Nodularia cf. spumigena has been an indicator of groundwater off of the coast of Bahamas and may provide insight into where Bonaire‟s groundwater enters the marine ecosystem. Bonaire is a tropical oceanic island with a fringing coral reef located in the south Caribbean Sea and, although the population of the island is small (~16,000), it has developed a population center of residential and commercial use in Kralendijk, a coastal city. To compare how the benthic cyanobacteria mats off of Bonaire relate to this growing population, a three-fold study was conducted. A large scale pattern of cyanobacteria was studied at nine sites on the leeward side, a medium scale pattern was studied at four sites off the coast of Kralendijk in between two known nutrient outputs, and tests of mean levels of Escherichia coli and total coliforms inside and outside the cyanobacteria mats were completed. Video transects were used to determine percent cover of the large and medium scale patterns and IDEXX technology was used to test pore water inside and outside the mats for two types of bacteria associated with human waste. No definite patterns of groundwater or population center were directly linked to benthic cyanobacteria cover. The large scale did show a higher average cyanobacteria cover throughout the three-year study, indicating that there may be a relationship between the hydrology of the island and nutrient circulation. The medium scale showed an inverse relationship between turf algae and cyanobacteria.

This student research was retrieved from Physis: Journal of Marine Science XII (Fall 2012)19: 9-15 from CIEE Bonaire.

Date
2012
Data type
Other resources
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Bonaire
Author

Caldora penicillata gen. nov., comb. nov. (Cyanobacteria), a pantropical marine species with biomedical relevance

Many tropical marine cyanobacteria are prolific producers of bioactive secondary metabolites with ecological relevance and promising pharmaceutical applications. One species of chemically rich, tropical marine cyanobacteria that was previously identified as Symploca hydnoides or Symploca sp. corresponds to the traditional taxonomic definition of Phormidium penicillatum. In this study, we clarified the taxonomy of this biomedically and ecologically important cyanobacterium by comparing recently collected specimens with the original type material and the taxonomic description of P. penicillatum. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer regions showed that P. penicillatum formed an independent clade sister to the genus Symploca, and distantly related toPhormidium and Lyngbya. We propose the new genus Caldora for this clade, with Caldora penicillata comb. nov. as the type species and designate as the epitype the recently collected strain FK13-1. Furthermore, the production of bioactive secondary metabolites among various geographically dispersed collections of C. penicillata showed that this species consistently produced the metabolite dolastatin 10 and/or the related compound symplostatin 1, which appear to be robust autapomorphic characters and chemotaxonomic markers for this taxon.

Date
2015
Data type
Scientific article
Theme
Research and monitoring

Bonaire National Marine Park—Algal Survey and Inventory

The Littler’s team [including Barrett Brooks, Don Hurlbert, Barbara Watanabe and Larry Gorenflo (Conservation International)] traveled to the island of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (1 Nov 06 to 14 Nov 06). The purpose of this expedition was to assist the Ministry of Nature Affairs for the Netherlands Antilles (MINA) and the Center for Applied Biodiversity Science at Conservation International to assess the current status of Bonaire’s marine flora. The team collected over 300 specimens from the upper reef to a depth of 56 m. This assessment increased the known species reported from Bonaire by 35% (Appendix II, List of Species). The marine flora is typical of many Caribbean reefs with no specific areas of extremely high diversity or unique species composition. Also included in this evaluation are over 100 digital images (Appendix III), properly identified to the species level in most cases. These images may be used by managers in web sites, oral presentation, training manuals, brouchures, etc., to make marine plant identification possible for Bonaire’s many divers, volunteers, conservationists or interested agencies.
The team surveyed the health of the reefs using key indicator species (recognized from our >30 continuous years of coral-reef research) in reference to the growing problems associated with eutrophication and overfishing along tropical and subtropical shorelines worldwide. The ecological responses of corals and macroalgae to nutrient enrichment and release from predation have been repeatedly cited as priority areas in need of further research (National Research Council, 2000; Littler & Littler 2006).

Date
2006
Data type
Other resources
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Bonaire