Conservation

Carbon Sequestration - Engaging Youth in Science and Conservation

Presentation from the Mangrove Restoration Workshop.  

Date
2021
Data type
Media
Theme
Education and outreach
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Aruba

Ma Kote Mangroves

Overview of St. Lucia's Mangroves

Used to draw comparisons with the mangroves of Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao and St. Maarten

Presented in 2021 Mangrove Restoration Workshop

Date
2021
Data type
Media
Theme
Education and outreach
Research and monitoring

What's Blue Carbon Got To Do With It?

How blue lcarbon supports sustainable development goals.

Presented in 2021 Mangrove Restoration Workshop

Date
2021
Data type
Media
Theme
Education and outreach
Research and monitoring
Document
Geographic location
Aruba
Bonaire
Curacao
Saba
Saba bank
St. Eustatius
St. Maarten

Ecosystem Restoration with Potato Waste

Presentation from the Mangrove Restoration Workshop.  

Date
2021
Data type
Media
Theme
Education and outreach
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Aruba
Bonaire
Curacao
Saba
Saba bank
St. Eustatius
St. Maarten

Application Form for Site of Importance for Bat Conservation (SICOM)

The Island of Bonaire possess a system of more than 150 natural caves, but only five of them are known to be used as diurnal and maternity roosts by the five species of cave-dwelling bats reported for this island. In the case of Natalus tumidirostris and Myotis nesopolus, Pos di Antoin is the only one. Additionally, this cave is the most important maternity roost known on Bonaire for Glossophaga longirostris and it is also used by all the species of cave-dwelling bats recorded on Bonaire. Its certification as SICOM will become crucial to support and reach the goal of changing its designation status in the Zone Planning to “Natural Area” and/or “Protection Zone-Cave”, in addition of providing this roost with adequate legislation and management plans for its protection. Besides this, its certification will complement the AICOMs and SICOMs already certified on the ABC islands.

Date
2018
Data type
Other resources
Theme
Governance
Geographic location
Bonaire
Image

Reforestation Project Final Report

Bonaire has never recovered from the historic felling of its trees. The strong influence of feral goats prevents rejuvenation in those parts where a plant cover is still present, thereby reducing the biodiversity of plant and tree species. In addition to these pressures, the habitat of the Yellow-shouldered Amazon parrot is under continual threat from commercial and residential development. Herbivore free enclosures as well as reforestation is a proven solution for the habitat degradation of the island. Due to the relatively harsh climatic conditions on Bonaire, the natural development of the vegetation is often slow. Exclusion of exotic herbivores and reforestation can be effective tools in order to add significantly to the biomass and vegetation development as well as other positive ecosystem services (Coolen, 2015; DCNA, 2013). Erosion control by the increased root development, soil and litter build-up, carbon sequestration and eventually canopy recovery are examples of these possible trade-offs. Important notice on the forest rehabilitation management is the absence of any scientific documentation about the original forest ecosystem present on the island before human impact. As the current vegetation of Bonaire is impacted and shaped by the presence of exotic herbivores, the current ecosystem is in a clearly degraded state. Forest restoration efforts by Echo are aimed at improving the biomass and biodiversity in order to rehabilitate the degraded vegetation, but the reforestation goals are always based on an estimation of the potential natural vegetation.

The main reforestation objective for Echo is forest restoration and creating awareness about the importance, degradation and vulnerability of the dry forest on Bonaire. This is done by involving the local community in the management and results of these reforestation areas. The scientific documentation of the vegetation within these reforestation enclosures by Echo can expand our knowledge about this important ecosystem. This can support future research on conservation and plant biodiversity in Bonaire. Current experiences with these 10 reforestation sites can furthermore add to the knowledge and sustainable management of plant resources of the island. As a result, Bonaire can be the ideal springboard for environmental innovation/restoration to be replicated and scaled once successful.

During the reforestation project Echo have build 10 exclusore reforestation site in the northern half of the island and planted a total of 14.523 trees together with the community as part of the reforestation project. The total fenced use to exclude the 10 reforestation area is 4550 meter to accumulate a total of 11.44 protected hectares for reforestation purpose. Followed the main activities completed to execute the project. Most of the activities done in the project are ongoing through maintenance and further development of new reforestation sites.

Date
2019
Data type
Other resources
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Bonaire
Author
Image

Avifaunal and Botanical Survey of The Jan Thiel Lagoon Conservation Area, Curaçao

The Jan Thiel lagoon can be considered the most important wetland of Curaçao based on its combined value as a feeding habitat for terns. As is likely the case in general with the other saliñas of Curaçao, Jan Thiel lagoon appears to be of the greatest significance to flamingos during the dry season when the larger wetlands in Venezuela run dry. The lagoon is also an area that has historically provided conditions suitable for massive nesting by rare species of terns. Nesting by terns still occurs but on a much lesser scale and with fewer species. During the rainy season, and because of the presence of many dams which retain fresh water on the eastern half of the lagoon, the area is of persistent value to several waterbirds which showed a preference for feeding in less saline water. These include species such as ducks, sandpipers, and black-winged stilts.

The lagoon is approximately 80 ha and is surrounded by approximately 228 ha of additional scenic conservation area which contain rare tracts of native vegetation and which provide valuable habitat to many other native species such as konènchi, sloke, tapa kaminda, and warawara. The best vegetations are found on the eastern side of the lagoon, particularly the southern quadrant of the eastern half of the lagoon. This quadrant has quite rare vegetation, best described as a Haematoxylon-Coccoloba vegetation in which the dreifi shimaron is found to be abundant on volcanic soil. Such vegetation is also known from areas of Oostpunt, Malpais, and Seru Cocori. Other species remarkably abundant in the Haematoxylon-Coccoloba unit include the mata piska and the palu di pushi while the presence of scattered kibrahacha and mangel di sabana likely indicate species which were once much more abundant but which have somehow survived the intensive use of this area in the past. Rare plant species found in the area include the trees lumbra blanku (Croton niveus), kurahout (Peltophorum acutifolum), mata kombles (Schoepfia schreberi), "fuma machu" (Vitex cymosa). For the latter species, less than 20 trees are known to exist in the Dutch Antilles. 

A major limitation to the avifaunal use of the lagoon, particularly the flamingos and tern nesting is the current high level of uncontrolled recreational disturbance. Unintentional recreational disturbance can likely be greatly reduced by a combination of properly informing visitors, by planting vegetation barriers to shelter visitors from the constant sight of the birds and by partially redirecting trails.

The planned Jan Thiel-Amandelweg road is a major threat to the ecological integrity of the conservation area. The road is protected to lie directly in the two most important freshwater areas bordering the lagoon and on top of one of the four locations which support tern breeding. The mere physical presence of the road is in itself a scourge to the vegetation as is cuts through a part of the Haematoxylon-Coccoloba vegetation and lies directly on top of three (fortunately resprouting) very rare Vitex cymosa trees. If this road is ever built it will add a large source of constant disturbance (incl. traffic noise) for much of the eastern half of the lagoon (which is the principal area used by the avifauna), and a major source of littering and contaminants from vehicles. 

The abandoned landfill of Koraal Specht has not been sealed to prevent rainwater percolation and several seeps were seen to emanate from the landfill and flow into the lagoon. The landfill likely forms a serious long-term threat to the lagoon and a study is needed with regards to the potential leaching of contaminants.

Date
1999
Data type
Research report
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Curacao
Image

Application Form for Area of Importance for Bat Conservation (AICOM) Washington - Slagbaai

The Island of Bonaire has a system of natural caves that probably exceeds 150 in number. Those caves house at least five species of bats: Leptonycteris curasoae, Mormoops megalophylla, Natalus tumidirostris, Myotis nesopolus and Glossophaga longirostris. The former four depend primarily or exclusively on caves as diurnal and maternity roosts. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species considers L. curasoae as Vulnerable. Several studies have underlined the importance of this bat as a pollinator and long-distance seed dispersal agent of several species of succulent plants in northern South America. Likewise, indirect evidence suggests that between December and March part of the populations of Aruba, Curaçao and Bonaire abandon these islands and move to the arid and semiarid zones of Venezuela and Colombia. Until now, we did not know that L. curasoae reproduced on Bonaire, but during the last three years, studies conducted on the island have shown that it is important as a mating and maternity site for the species. At present, we have identified four caves used as maternity roosts. Mormoops megalophylla also reproduces on Bonaire, with at least two maternity caves. Recognition of the Washington–Slagbaai National Park and surrounding areas as an AICOM will contribute to protecting the main habitat types used by all species present on the island as food sources and roosts.

Date
2012
Data type
Other resources
Theme
Legislation
Geographic location
Bonaire
Image