Birds

Raw data of terrestrial bird observation on St.Eustatius from 2009-2015

Raw data of terrestrial bird observation on St.Eustatius by STENAPA. Observation include habitat, observer, plot, transect/point observation, species, number of individuals, heard/seen the bird, distance, etc.

Please contact STENAPA for more information.

Date
2015
Data type
Raw data
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
St. Eustatius
Private Document

Birds Caribbean Conference, Jamaica

BirdsCaribbean held its 20th international conference in Kingston Jamaica from 25 to 29 July 2015. The theme of the meeting was “Birds—Connecting Communities and Conservation”.

 

This news article was published in BioNews 17.

BioNews is produced by the Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance and funded by the Ministry of Economic Affairs.

Date
2015
Data type
Media
Tags

The salinas of Bonaire: how does bird activity impact epi- and infaunal communities?

Predators can play an important role in shaping prey community structure and function through direct and indirect top-down effects. Bird predators in particular can decrease lower trophic level populations in a variety of habitats from terrestrial soils to coastal sediments. In the unique, high salinity salina habitats of Bonaire, NA top-down effects may be present as a result of the migratory bird community consuming epi- and infaunal organisms. In this study, I assessed the make-up of the bird community feeding in three salinas (Marina, Sorobon, City Shop) through morning and evening observations as well as the epi- and infaunal organisms of salina sediments through coring. The birds found to utilize the sediments of the salinas for feeding included flamingos, reddish egrets, great egrets, snowy egrets, great blue herons, plovers, and willets; different species richness per site. The coastal succulent, Sesuvium portulacastrum, and seagrass occupy the salinas from approximately 1%-8%. Snails were found in the sediments of all 3 locations (Sorobon 24.9 ± 7.6 m-2 , Marina & City shop 0.3 ± 0.58 m-2 ) and fiddler crabs (8.93 ± 4.05 m-2 ) were found only at the Marina site. In addition, I attempted to understand how the birds may structure infaunal communities through their feeding habits by using field-based feeding preference choice assays. Five plots, separated into four squares containing crabs, snails, plants, and a control (one per square), were placed at each of the three previously chosen monitoring locations. The plants and snails were not consumed in the experimental food assays, but approximately 90% of the crabs were consumed. The crab densities and percent plant coverage in the control plots remained constant to the original data collected, suggesting the feeding assay plots didn’t have an affect on the predators feeding. The presence of crabs at Marina and snails at Sorobon may be supported by the differences in sediment composition. Sediments at Marina were found to be composed of more coarser-grained particles versus the sediments at Sorobon which are more fine-grained particles. This may suggest that bottom-up effects may impact, shape the epi- and infaunal communities where potential predators are present.

This student research was retrieved from Physis: Journal of Marine Science V (Spring 2009)19: 14-19 from CIEE Bonaire.

Date
2009
Data type
Other resources
Theme
Research and monitoring
Tags
Geographic location
Bonaire
Author

Birds of Aruba – ABC Checklist version May 4, 2016 – 252 species

A bird checklist is a snapshot in time. A checklist becomes outdated the moment a new species is registered. This checklist is based on seven sources that were cross checked. The oldest work used in this research dates back to 1983 and is from Professor Voous who presented 179 species of birds for Aruba back then. Of course, the number of species in subsequent lists increases with time. We also found that some authors had one or more observations than others did. Cross checking the sources has been a valuable instrument in the analysis process. From 2010 to date, 16 new observations for Aruba have been made. These have been added to the checklist, rendering the number of species observed at this time in Aruba at 252 species.
 

Date
2016
Data type
Other resources
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Aruba
Author

An Avifauna Review of Sint Eustatius

Documentation of significant avian sightings on Sint Eustatius between 19th November 2014 and 11th February 2015 by Steffan Walton, STENAPA. With no previous records, the sightings of Wilson’s Snipe Gallinago delicata and Rose-breasted Grosbeak Pheucticus ludovicianus are of particular interest.

Date
2015
Data type
Other resources
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
St. Eustatius
Author

Density and Population Size of Yellow-shouldered Parrots (Amazona barbadensis rothschildi) and Brown-throated Parakeets (Aratinga pertinax xanthogenius) on Bonaire, Netherland Antilles

In December 2009, we sampled 62 6-minute random-systematic counting points (k) to estimate the density and population size of yellow-shouldered parrots and brown-throated parakeets in a survey region (A) of 7,873 hectares, which covered the WashingtonSlaagbai National Park and forest, suburban, and agricultural areas between Brasil, Karpata, Dos Pos, Rincón, and Fontein. In March 2010, we sampled 104 points, covering a survey region of 17,000 hectares that included forest, urban, suburban, and agricultural areas in northern, central, and southern Bonaire....

Date
2010
Data type
Other resources
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Bonaire

Monitoring program for waterbirds inhabiting the saliñas located on the northwest of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Year report 2010

Management Recommendations:

Expand the boundaries of the Washington Slagbaai National Park to include all the salts flats included in this monitoring program as well as their catchment areas in order to give adequate protection to the whole system of lagoons located in northwestern Bonaire.

Approach the Ramsar convection with the proposal to change the Ramsar designations of Salina Slagbaai and Salina Goto for one denomination that will include all the Salt flat in the system using the name of our Washington Slagbaai National Park.

Keep collecting data for the long term monitoring programs. It is fundamental for the proper management of our natural resources.

Hire more staff for the Natural and Historic Resources Unit of STINAPA Bonaire.

As resources and/or time become available, conduct scientific research for a better understanding of the ecological functions of the salt flat as a habitat for water birds.

As resources and/or time become available, start baseline research for a monitoring program for the nesting season of our resident waterbirds.

As resources and/or time become available, expand the monitoring program in order to include the salt flats in Central and South of Bonaire.

Improve this monitoring program by moving up to the next level through participation in the CWC (Caribbean Waterbird Census). This is an initiative taken by the SCSCB (Society of Conservation and Study of Caribbean Birds). 

Date
2011
Data type
Research report
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Bonaire

Striated or Green Herons in the South Caribbean Islands?

Abstract:

Of 123 adult and semi-adult Little Herons Butorides striatus examined from the South Caribbean Islands of Aruba, Curaçao, and Bonaire, either as study-skins, observed in the field or shown on colourslides, 115 (93%) were of the red-necked North American and Caribbean virescens subspecies type, whereas 7 (6%) showed characters intermediate between virescens and the continental South American striatus subspecies type. Once (1%) an apparently phenotypically "pure" B. s. striatus was observed (3 Oct. 1979, Bonaire). The South Caribbean Island's breeding birds should be namend Butorides striatus maculatus rather than Ardeola striata striata as listed by PAYNE (1979). Three specimens (19%) of 16 measured proved to be long-winged migrants from North America, B. s. virescens (17 Nov. 1951, 27 Nov. 1951, 21 Oct. 1954). 

Date
1985
Data type
Other resources
Theme
Research and monitoring
Geographic location
Bonaire
Author

A manual for the landbird monitoring program of STINAPA Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles

About 210 resident and migratory bird species are found on the island of Bonaire. More than half of these species are landbirds. Some of the landbirds are endemic subspecies. Despite its small area, Birdlife International designated five Important Bird Areas (IBAs) on Bonaire. This manual is a working tool for STINAPA employees and volunteers doing landbird surveys on Bonaire.

1) The monitoring program covers the areas considered potential habitat for feeding, nesting, and roosting of the selected species of landbirds on Bonaire. 2) Surveys are conducted at least twice per year (February-March and September-October). About 10 days are needed per sampling period. 3) Morning counts start after sunrise and stop at 10:00 hours. Afternoon counts start at 16:00 hours and stop before sunset. 4) At least two observers are needed for the collection of count and supplementary data related to habitat, food, disturbance, and other factors that may affect species detection and abundance at sampling units (fixed on-road and off-road points). 5) Additional information are collected about uncommon observations, such as large flocks in roosting areas, nesting activity, the presence of predators, and any other observation that may be of interest for research, monitoring, and management purposes. The location of these observations is recorded using GPS units. Date, time, and additional comments are also recorded. When possible photos are taken to provide complete documentation for future reference and consultation as needed. 6) Weather conditions are recorded as part of standard data collection. 7) Just like any other activity conducted by STINAPA Bonaire, human safety is always considered a priority over the completion of survey activities.

Date
2010
Data type
Monitoring protocol
Theme
Education and outreach
Geographic location
Bonaire